• St. Mary’s Church in Nonington: monumental inscriptions noted by the Reverend Bryan Faussett in 1758

      The Reverend Bryan Faussett (1720-1776) was a  wealthy Kent clergyman who pioneered archaeology in Kent and excavated and recorded scores of sites in parishes in close proximity to Nonington.These excavations were recorded in  “Inventorium Sepulchrale: an Account of Some Antiquities Dug Up at Gilton, Kingston, Sibertswold, Barfriston, Beakesbourne, Chartham, and Crundale, in the County of Kent, from A.D. 1757 to A.D. 1773”. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ The following are notes he made in 1758 on the memorials and inscriptions then to be found in St. Mary’s Church, Nonington. ++++++++++++++++++ Chancell. 30. A Very Handsome Altar Piece. 31. On ye East Wall, on ye North Side of the Communion Table is the following…

  • Nonington: settlement before the Anglo-Saxons

    Aerial photographs of the old parish of Nonington taken in the last half of the 20th century clearly indicate  the sites of several early settlements dating back to the Iron Age [circa 500 BC onwards] and beyond. Accidental finds over the last couple of centuries of worked flints, pottery sherds and pot boilers in fields or gardens uncovered by ploughing or gardening have given strong indications of the locations of  sites of early habitation, and  a handful of organized archaeological excavations from the mid-19th century onwards have provided more definite evidence as to where some of the early inhabitants of Nonington lived on a more permanent basis. Pre-historic finds near…

  • Ralph Colkyn of Esol in Nonington: the massacre of the Jews of Canterbury and the Second Barons War (1264–1267)

      When Henry III succeeded to the English throne after the death of his father, King John, in 1216. He initially had the support of the powerful English barons. However,  over the years support for the King ebbed away as he became increasingly unpopular with many of the barons believing Henry to be an ineffective monarch who was influenced by foreign favourites, levied increasingly harsher taxation, and waged expensive foreign wars for his own personal gain. As opposition to Henry’s perceived misrule grew many of the discontented barons looked to Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, for leadership and he became increasingly more powerful. De Montfort and his supporters wanted…

  • The Fredville “Step Tree” and other chestnuts. Updated 24.4.20

    In the 1930’s Dr. Hardman, a noted East Kent historian recorded the memories of  Richard Jarvis Arnold of of life in Nonington in the 1880’s & 90’s. Mr. Arnold, a blacksmith born in Nonington but who later lived and worked in Walmer, recollected: “The trees of Fredville Park were well known. In addition to the old oak there were some large chestnuts. One was called the ‘Step Tree’ and had some steps affixed to it. In the upper part of the trunk and branches 12 or 20 people could sit”. It was said that members of the Plumptre family often had tea on the platform in the “Step Tree” in the years before the…

  • Nonington Parish Charities

      Thomas Bate of Challock held land in Challock and Nonington with which he made charitable  bequests during the reign of Henry VIII. In Nonington his bequest consisted of:- “Landes given by Thomas Bate to thentent that one priest shulde celebrate masse within the said parishe iij (3) tymes yerelie for ever. Also: rent or  ferme of v rods (5 rods or 1 ¼ acres) of land in the parish of Nonyngton next Harelestrete (Holt Street Buttes, now Butter Street) butts now or late in the tenure of Richard Mockett there, yerely  ijs (2s) (previously owned by the Knights of St. John and confiscated by the Crown). Also: rent or…

  • Holt Street Farm in Nonington: the Slave Trade, Caribbean Pirates, and the founding of the British Museum.

    It is now difficult to believe that the pleasant hamlet of Holt Street, more especially the present Holt Street Farm, had connections to the Atlantic Slave Trade between West Africa and the Caribbean. This was one of the darkest periods in British history which, whilst bringing incredible riches to a few European plantation owners, brought unimaginable misery to thousands of male and female convicts sentenced to transportation by English and Irish courts and millions of forcibly enslaved Africans who laboured and died on these wealth creating Caribbean plantations. The connection is as follows. By the 1660’s the fortunes of Major John Boys of Fredville were in terminal decline. Years of…

  • Nonnington via Sandwich to London by sea, a weekly service!

    In the 1830′s Nonington was served by a weekly service to London via the port of Sandwich allowing residents, especially the shop keepers, to have goods brought in from outside of East Kent.  I only became aware of this service when I was fortunate enough to find an original hand-bill for “The first hoy for Sandwich”  at a local boot-fair in 2012. The service departed every Saturday from Chester’s Quay, near the Tower of London and took in “goods and passengers for Sandwich, Walmer, Wingham, Eastry, Mongham, Goodnestone, Deal, Ash, Littlebourn, Tilmanstone, Nonnington, Eythorn”.  Nonington was therefore in much closer contact with the capital than was previously thought and those residents…

  • The Quadryng family at Fredeuyle and Esol-revised and updated 03.01.2020

    John Quadryng, a City of London mercer, acquired one half of the Manor of Fredeuyle, as Freydvill’ was by then known, in the opening years of the 15th century and the manor remained with the Quadryng, also Quadring, family for much of that century. It’s not clear when the Quadryngs acquired the Esol house and lands as there are at present no known records of any such property purchases by the Quardryngs. It’s highly likely that they purchased Esol house and lands from Sir John Harleston at the same time, or possibly before, they acquired the Manor of Fredeuyle. A mercer by trade, John Quadryng may have bought Esol partly as…

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